1. Japan Handmade Digest



  2. Wooden sushi set, by Dwell Studio

    More here



  3. ‘December’ chair by Jasper Morrison and Wataru Kumano for Nikari

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    The latest as well as the last of the 12 designs from Nikari’s year-long project DESIGNS FOR NATURE, which brought together some of world’s most renowned designers or design studios, who, each month, created a wooden product, this pared-down, minimalist chair was developed in a collaborative process between the famed English product and furniture designer Jasper Morrison and Tokyo-based Wataru Kumano. Made of ash and natural wood oil mixture, here’s what the creators of ‘DECEMBER’ say about its design:

    "We talked about the pleasure in making things and the idea of a chair that could be bought in a box and built at home. Considering Nikari’s skill in wood work, we worked up the idea of a chair which could be made by following easy instructions. The core of the design is the seat frame which is already assembled, to which the legs and back rest structure are attached with a combination of screwing and glueing. It’s a basic but comfortable low chair with a slightly rural character and definite scandinavian influence, the kind of chair you would have in a country house near the fire, though it could work in a city apartment or a hotel lobby just as well."



  4. SAL headphones, by Amadana

    Japanese brand Amadana releases a stunning set of headphones, the Style-D from their new SAL “Style and Live” collection. The unique design is complemented by 30mm dynamic drivers and a built-in inline mic for all your phone calls.



  5. The Successor of Kakiemon

    How does one take over a company that is four centuries old and has been run by one’s father, his father’s father and so on. Here is the unique story of such a time capsule where we witness how a modern-day Japanese family that has transformed everyday pottery into the world famous mythical Kakiemon porcelain and preserves its traditions, now passes on the leadership to their only son. Is he up to the task that lies ahead? What’s at stake if this successor does not succeed?

    Kakiemon, one of the most refined types of porcelain, was developed in the 17th century by ceramist Sakaida Kakiemon. Today, the production, entirely handmade and handpainted is still owned by his direct descendants. Keeping this tradition alive is more than just reproducing craft. It is somewhat a statement against modernity end massproduction. After periods of isolation and expansion, wars, nuclear bombs and now a devastating earthquake, this Japanese family is clinging to tradition – no matter how fragile it is.

    vía



  6. Cooffee cup and saucer

    An original from Akira Minagawa’s faux-Finnish label Mina Perhonen.

    via



  7. in the mood…

    in the mood…



  8. Monomatopee | inflatable fashion inspired by origami

    Monomatopee is a brand found by Kazuhiro Matsukawa (The fourth generation of MARUMARU Co. Ltd) as The 110th anniversary of MARUMASU Co. Ltd. 

    Monomatopopee has a clear 4 consciousness

    1.Keep creating product with the concept of “onomatopoeic” 
    2.Everything is made in Japan to help to regeneration of Japanese fiber industry. 
    3.To create everything by them. (The material, The design, and The needlework method, etc… ) 
    4.Not making a grow fast die fast fashion trend, but create a long lasting brand.

    Cool right?

    via



  9. 

Steps, by Kohdai Iwamoto
“steps” is a bench for a parent and child can be used for a long time by changing the way of how it is used along with child’s growing steps. Placing the stool under the hole of seat, it is a table for the child. When the child grows a little older, they can sit next to each other at the same level by fitting the stool back into the hole.
designer: Kohdai IWAMOTOsize:W.1,000 × D.420 × H.420 (stool / φ335 × H.250)material : beech, urethane foam, fabric
via

    Steps, by Kohdai Iwamoto

    “steps” is a bench for a parent and child can be used for a long time by changing the way of how it is used along with child’s growing steps. Placing the stool under the hole of seat, it is a table for the child. When the child grows a little older, they can sit next to each other at the same level by fitting the stool back into the hole.

    designer: Kohdai IWAMOTO
    size:W.1,000 × D.420 × H.420 (stool / φ335 × H.250)
    material : beech, urethane foam, fabric

    via



  10. Miyazaki & Friends.

    Miyazaki & Friends.



  11. If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.

    — 

    Haruki Murakami



  12. The Ice Ball

    We recently had the chance to taste The Hakushu, a 12 year old single malt made by Suntory Whisky. In the process we became enamored with their use of a hand carved ice ball. To learn more we visited The Summit, a bar in New York’s Alphabet City neighborhood to learn a little more about the process. In our video Gardner Dunn, Suntory’s National Brand Ambassador, gave us the run down on the traditional production, purpose and use of the ice ball in Japanese whisky culture.

    via Cool Hunting Rough Cut



  13. Toyota Camatte concept unveiled – video

    The Toyota Camatte is a family-friendly show model built with simple body panels and parts that can be easily removed and swapped to create a variety of design and colour combinations.

    Designed firmly as a concept with no plans for production, the idea behind the Camatte is to introduce children to the fun of driving, customising and owning a car.

    Just 2.7 metres long and 1.2 metres in height, it gives families an opportunity to really get to grips with handling car components, promoting an understanding of the structure and workings of motor vehicles to the future generation of drivers.

    The parts that can be interchanged include the major body panels, the clamshell that combines the doors and roof as well as the lights, tyres and rear seats.

    It has an innovative one-plus-two interior seating layout with pedals and seats that can be positioned to allow children to operate the controls and develop driving skills (where legal, of course) while an adult seated in one of the rear seats assists steering and braking.

    The triangular seating arrangement reduces the distance between the single, center-positioned driver’s seat and the two rear seats to emphasize family intimacy and aid parent-child communication, creating a fun space to enjoy driving.

    Two versions will be displayed at the show, called the Camatte Sora and Camatte Daichi.

    The name Camatte was chosen as it comes from the Japanese word for ‘care’, meaning to signify ‘caring for others’ and ‘caring for cars’.

    via



  14. 

Hironao Tsuboi: Omega for Arflex Japan
'omega' for arflex japan, is the result of japanese designer hironao tsuboi’s desire to produce a precisely crafted chair. its gossamer robe-like belt seamlessly extends through the backrest, armrests and legs, giving it an elegant stance. the entire piece is elaborately made in fine details by using traditonal japanese techniques and methods by carefully sculpting each section by hand. with this, the form is created three-dimensionally from individual solid slabs of wood. the chair comes in three different variations including: natural oak, dark oak and black walnut. 
via

    Hironao Tsuboi: Omega for Arflex Japan

    'omega' for arflex japan, is the result of japanese designer hironao tsuboi’s desire to produce a precisely crafted chair. its gossamer robe-like belt seamlessly extends through the backrest, armrests and legs, giving it an elegant stance. the entire piece is elaborately made in fine details by using traditonal japanese techniques and methods by carefully sculpting each section by hand. with this, the form is created three-dimensionally from individual solid slabs of wood. the chair comes in three different variations including: natural oak, dark oak and black walnut. 

    via



  15. Nintendo Characters as Ukiyo-e Prints

    Illustrator and all-around Japan aficionado Jed Henry has begun producing a series of amusing prints illustrating classic Nintendo characters/games as woodblock prints of 17th and 18th century Japan. The response from geeks around the world has prompted him to set up a Facebook group. He’s also promised to start a kickstarter campaign in order to sell the prints.

    via

    Link from Zelda

    Mega Man

    Samus Aran from Metroid

    Mario Kart (sketch)